Attempting to stay in bounds

It has been nearly a month since Colin Kaepernick was first noticed for sitting out the national anthem. Many thought that his gesture and stance would be talked about for a few days and like many other things would fade. But Kaepernick’s movement has done everything but that.

INDIANA FEVER

On Wednesday, the WNBA’s Indiana Fever became the first professional sports team to take on the protest. Prior to its playoff game against the Phoenix Mercury, which eventually won the game, the entire team took a knee and linked arms during the national anthem. They were even joined by two Mercury players Mistie Bass and Kelsey Bone.

This isn’t the first time that a WNBA team has spoken out either. In July, prior to Kaepernick, players for the Minnesota Lynx, New York Liberty, Fever and Mercury players wore T-shirts with messages seeking change following the deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling.

TEXAS YOUTH FOOTBALL TEAM

The movement has gained many supporters at the high school and youth level. Unfortunately these athletes aren’t immune to the backlash that comes with being involved in such a high-profile protest.

A youth football team is receiving death threats after deciding as a team to take a knee prior to a game on Sept. 11 in Beaumont, Texas. The decision to protest was brought up by the children ages 11-12 and was supported by the coaches and parents. According to a mother whose son is on the team, online comments have said their “coaches and players should be lynched. They should have burned in 9/11. There are people who are saying the n-word.”

Some say the kids don’t know what they are kneeling for, but these kids aren’t blind to what is going on around the country.

On Tuesday, Kaepernick came out saying that he has received death threats.

“To me, if something like that were to happen, you’ve proved my point and it will be loud and clear for everyone why it happened and that would move this movement forward at a greater speed than what it is even now,” Kaepernick said. “Granted, I don’t want that to happen, but that’s the realization of what could happen, and I knew there were other things that came along with this when I first stood up and spoke about it. That’s not something I haven’t thought about.”

How is this right? You may not agree with Kaepernick’s and others motives or methods, but when is it ever OK to threaten someone’s life because of it? People making death threats to Kaepernick and anyone else who have knelt in support of him are only fueling the fire.

CAM NEWTON

During a press conference Wednesday night, the Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton fielded questions regarding racial issues despite normally being hesitant. His comments came a day after the fatal shooting of Keith L. Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, which sparked protests throughout the city.

“We all have to hold each other accountable,” Newton said. “I’m a firm believer of justice. I’m a firm believer of doing the right thing. And I can’t repeat it enough of just holding people accountable. … I am not happy with what or how the justice has been kind of dealt with over the years.”

Newton has not joined the Kaepernick movement, but he is the latest NFL player to come forward and make a statement regarding the need for change. During the press conference he asked the same question that Kaepernick did in one of his first interviews: how do police on a leave of absence still get paid?

The reigning NFL MVP has commented on social issues before and knows the backlash that often comes with it. He called the place that he stands along with many other athletes a lose-lose.

All about that photofinish

There is something about that photo finish that makes me get butterflies in my stomach and sit at the edge of my chair.

The swimming competition brought us a few photo finishes in the first week of the 2016 Summer Olympics, but it has been at Olympic Stadium, where track and field has gotten underway in week two, where the best photo finishes have happened.

THE DIVE

Perhaps the most controversial event finish of the games thus far was the women’s 400-meter dash. One of the most anticipated races, it featured U.S. sprinter Allyson Felix, also known as the Queen of track. The four-time Olympic gold medalist was the favorite to win and she put up one heck of a fight but finishing the footrace on her feet led to a silver medal finish.

Heading into the final 200-meters it was unclear if Felix would even be able to make the podium, hanging with the middle of the pack, but in the final 100-meter she burst past the rest of the field and drew even with Bahamian Shaunae Miller. Miller had led throughout the race.

50-meters left and I knew it would be a photo finish. The two sprinters were neck and neck. I sat there in anticipation for the result. I thought Felix crossed first but then the photo went up on the screen and it was obvious that the gold was going to Miller who crossed the finish line in a diving fashion.

An avid track fan and a sprinter myself back in the day, the diving finish was an after thought for me. Miller definitely was not the first sprinter on the men’s or women’s side to do it, and yet almost immediately social media users went crazy saying Felix got robbed.

The question then became, did Miller fall or did she dive? Replay definitely made it look like she dove. A fall I can condone, you have so much momentum going into that finish line. Sprinters are taught to lean knowing that ones torso it what marks the finish, it’s quite easy to lose balance. To dive across the finish line is questionable but according to the track and field governing body, IAAF, it’s completely legal.

Clearly many think this is a terrible rule and I don’t disagree. There should be clarification, what constitutes as a fall and what constitutes as a dive. How can diving be allowed in what is described as a footrace?

I wish I could say Felix got robbed of a potential fifth gold medal but with the rules being as they are and me knowing she isn’t the first to do it, I can’t. Miller won and she did it by leaving everything out on the track.

THE KING AND HIS PRODIGY

Sometimes photo finishes aren’t about figuring out who the winner is sometimes it’s simply just about the photo. The men’s 200-meter semifinal provided one of those perfect photo moments.

Coming out of the turn Usain Bolt was in the lead and it was clear no one would be catching him. It became a race for the other automatic qualifying spot. Canada’s Andre De Grasse ran a great race. The further down the final stretch he got the further he pulled away from the rest of the field.

Then Bolt decided to slow down like he normally does in effort to save some energy. At 29-years-old it’s become a little more important in the sprinters routine. But De Grasse seemed to kick it up a notch, pushing Bolt to the finish line.

The reaction of the finish where the two runners neared and crossed the finish line with smiles on their faces was a positive one, but was it a positive one for the runners? Bolt seemed not entertained by the 21-year-olds antics. He is even quoted as saying, “it wasn’t cool.”

For some, Bolt’s reaction fuels the fire in the belief that the runner is too cocky. Bolt has every right to be cocky, but De Grasse has every right to push the envelope. Bolt can’t tell him how to run a race. Either way it will be entertaining to watch the two in the final.

Now is not the time to ‘stick to sports’

2016-ESPY-Awards-LeBron-James-620x413

Opening comments by Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul, Dwayne Wade, and Lebron James. Photo credit: Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Last night was the ESPY Awards, and it solidified itself as my favorite awards show by not doing what some say it should have done — “stick to sports.” I used to use sports as my shield from the events that were going on around me. It’s easy to forget the troubles in the world when baseball’s All-Star week is happening.

It took me moving around the United States and traveling the world in the last two years for me to finally open my eyes. Today sports are no longer a wall keeping me in, and I’m learning just how valuable of a platform they can be. Part of my desire to become a journalist is the ability to enlighten and educate, but also the reach that one can have with readers and viewers. The reach as a journalist though doesn’t compare to the reach of lets say Carmelo Anthony.

Anthony, LeBron James, Dwayne Wade and Chris Paul took the stage Wednesday night to open the ESPYs with a very important message.

“The racial profiling has to stop,” Wade said. “The shoot-to-kill mentality has to stop. Not seeing the value of black and brown bodies has to stop. But also the retaliation has to stop. The endless gun violence in places like Chicago, Dallas, not to mention in Orlando, it has to stop.”

Based off Twitter, not everyone was happy with the basketball stars’ opening statements. Some even went as far as saying they lost respect for the athletes, and to that I say shame on you. Athletes rarely take stands on issues because by doing so they are putting their brands on the line. For them speaking out can be a calculated decision.

Following the shootings last week, Anthony knew he had to say something, but he carefully thought out what that was going to be. When he approached his friends about making a statement at the awards. it took him days to figure out what exactly he wanted or rather needed to say.

The NBA stars aren’t the first to speak out about recent events. On Saturday, members of the Minnesota Lynx WNBA team wore T-shirts in solidarity of all recent events, and they too received an extreme backlash.

Unfortunately these players can no longer afford to be silent. It’s not a political statement for these athletes; as people of color they are affected regardless of the fact that they are professional athletes.

“There’s NO more sitting back and being afraid of tackling and addressing political issues anymore. Those days are long gone,” Anthony wrote in an Instagram post under the iconic photo from the 1967 Muhammad Ali Summit.

I have always felt that athletes have the responsibility to stand up and use their reach. Some of my favorite athletes are the ones that do so despite the repercussions. In an op-ed for The Guardian, Anthony calls for his fellow athletes to use their platform and their influence. While you may not agree with what they stand for today, don’t persecute them; one day you might want them to stand with you on something else.

The opener by the NBA ensemble wasn’t the only issue to be tackled Wednesday night. Breanna Stewart, the winner of the Best Female Athlete Award, as well as Abby Wambach, Icon Award winner, spoke out about gender equality.

And there wasn’t a dry eye in the crowd after 15-year-old Zaevion Dobson was honored with the Arthur Ashe Courage Award posthumously. His mother, Zenobia Dobson, called for the country “to take a stand to consider the effects of gun violence on the families throughout America.” Dobson was the first of two minors from his family to be killed due to gun violence within the last year.

Play like a girl

Earlier this month I learned that 70-percent of kids are quitting sports by age 13. It’s a startling statistic but what I learned earlier this week is even more alarming. Of that original 70 percent, 47 percent are girls.

According to the Women’s Sports Foundation, by age 14, girls are dropping out of sports at twice the rate of boys. And according to a survey sponsored by Always, by age 17, more than half of the girls, 51 percent, will have quit sports. More than 1,000 girls ages of 16 to 24 participated.

In last week’s column, I delved into the idea that sports just aren’t “fun anymore.” But with girls there seems to be a different driving factor. According to the Always survey, seven out of 10 girls quit sports during puberty because they felt like they didn’t belong. Another 67 percent said they felt society doesn’t encourage girls to play sports.

Not sure if you’ve heard of the #LikeAGirl campaign by Always, but it is these numbers that led to its creation. In the last year, Always has published multiple videos with the hope of inspiring girls to stay in the game. That is definitely something I can rally around.

No one can deny the benefits of sports in the lives of youth. The health benefits are just the beginning. Sports have the ability to teach us skills that can be used throughout the rest of our lives. With girls participating in sports at a lower rate than boys, they are missing out.

Confidence is the No. 1 thing that comes to mind when I think of what sports can offer all kids, but especially girls who deal with dramatic drops in confidence levels around puberty. Confidence is vital as we grow up, leave home and enter the workforce. Confidence is what we need in order to know our worth. One fact that has come about in trying to understand the gender pay gap is that women oftentimes underestimate their self worth. We are willing to work for less and we ask for less than men wanting the same position with the same skill set.

Learning to compete is another skill that sports teach. Oftentimes, girls are pushed away from competitive atmospheres because they aren’t deemed “ladylike.” Without a positive competitive atmosphere, girls inadvertently learn to feel guilty when their success outshines someone else’s. Once again this doesn’t help in the professional world where women continue to be outnumbered by men. Men are taught that competition is good and take fun in competing with friends on a day-to-day basis. From a young age, males turn everything and anything into a competition, girls are taught the opposite. This puts women at a disadvantage when trying to compete for senior roles.

According to a global study by Ernst & Young and espnW, 61 percent of female executives said sports contributed to their career and success. To add to that, 94 percent of women in the C-suite played sports, 52 percent at the university level.

Sports can also teach girls about teamwork and how to overcome adversity. And yet, girls feel that these skills aren’t meant for them. In a different national Always-sponsored survey, of 1,800 people, 89 percent of girls ages 16-24 feel there is pressure to conform to the way a girl is supposed to feel and act.

Its 2016, it’s been 44 years since Title IX was passed. Girls today have more opportunities than girls of the 1960s and yet the social and cultural stigmas from then have persisted.

The only way things are going to change is by changing how we as a society view gender roles. We need to believe and act upon the idea that girls and boys have the same capabilities and we need to prepare both for success in the same way.

For access to the surveys mentioned in this column visit, https://www.womenssportsfoundation.org/home/support-us/do-you-know-the-factors-influencing-girls-participation-in-sports and http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160628005793/en.

383244_10150350790749053_793870638_n

I was a part of the Michigan State Women’s Rowing team my freshman year of college.

When Damage leads to Success

Almost seven years have passed since female sportscaster Erin Andrews made her spotlight debut. Unfortunately for her and for aspiring women in sports, her debut wasn’t a positive one. On July 16, 2009, a video of Andrews where she appeared completely nude was posted online and quickly went viral.

I can remember when it all first went down. As a sophomore in high school and an aspiring sports journalist, I could only feel sorry for Andrews. I had been told over and over again how tough it is for women in the industry and this seemed to be making things worse.

There were debates on whether it was a publicity stunt. There were people saying it was another reason why women should not be in the industry.

The video was filmed by Michael David Barrett with a cellphone through a hotel peephole at the Nashville, Marriott adjacent to Vanderbilt University. Barrett was arrested in October 2009 and was sentenced to 30 months in prison. He has already served over two years.

Prior to the incident, if someone had dropped Andrews’ name I would have been like, “Who?”

Since the video’s release Andrews’ career has taken off. Before the video, people described her as the blonde girl on ESPN; after the video everyone knew who Andrews was.

The idea that it was all a publicity stunt followed Andrews for a while via the media. But even when the news forgets, people do not. When reporting from the sidelines there are still men who yell down at her, “I’ve seen your video! I saw you naked!”

In October 2015, Andrews filed a complaint against the Nashville Marriott and Barrett for $75 million. The hearing began on Feb. 22, and on March 7 the jury awarded Andrews $55 million. The jury found Barrett to be 51 percent at fault and the Nashville Marriott 49 percent at fault.

When I heard that the jury went in favor of Andrews, I could not be happier for her. But at the same time I can’t help but feel for her because once again she is the topic of conversation and not in a fully positive light.

There were comments on articles saying that the two parties should not have to pay because she did not suffer any damages. There were comments saying she abused the system. Comments saying she should be thankful that someone thought she was hot enough to go to those lengths.

“Her career skyrocketed, her career went up, so from our perspective, none of the benchmarks that would indicate a serious mental injury existed,” Marc Redman said after the verdict.

Redman is a lawyer for the two companies that owned the hotel at the time.

My question to the lawyers of the hotel companies: Would you have preferred Andrews to let everything she worked so hard for disappear?

I was never a big Andrews fan. When I would tell people I wanted to be a sports reporter, they’d ask, “Like Erin Andrews?” And I would always reply with no. But her strength through everything that happened, staying in the business, charging forward and not letting all the comments get to her, at least not in the public eye, made my respect level soar.

Women in the sports industry walk an extremely thin line. We need to be extra cautious of our actions and our words. We need to constantly be on our A game.

Andrews may never get the $55 million, but that isn’t what matters. The result of this lawsuit represents assault victims alike. It can hopefully help Andrews heal. And most of all it will hopefully act as a benchmark so that future incidents never happen.