All about that photofinish

There is something about that photo finish that makes me get butterflies in my stomach and sit at the edge of my chair.

The swimming competition brought us a few photo finishes in the first week of the 2016 Summer Olympics, but it has been at Olympic Stadium, where track and field has gotten underway in week two, where the best photo finishes have happened.

THE DIVE

Perhaps the most controversial event finish of the games thus far was the women’s 400-meter dash. One of the most anticipated races, it featured U.S. sprinter Allyson Felix, also known as the Queen of track. The four-time Olympic gold medalist was the favorite to win and she put up one heck of a fight but finishing the footrace on her feet led to a silver medal finish.

Heading into the final 200-meters it was unclear if Felix would even be able to make the podium, hanging with the middle of the pack, but in the final 100-meter she burst past the rest of the field and drew even with Bahamian Shaunae Miller. Miller had led throughout the race.

50-meters left and I knew it would be a photo finish. The two sprinters were neck and neck. I sat there in anticipation for the result. I thought Felix crossed first but then the photo went up on the screen and it was obvious that the gold was going to Miller who crossed the finish line in a diving fashion.

An avid track fan and a sprinter myself back in the day, the diving finish was an after thought for me. Miller definitely was not the first sprinter on the men’s or women’s side to do it, and yet almost immediately social media users went crazy saying Felix got robbed.

The question then became, did Miller fall or did she dive? Replay definitely made it look like she dove. A fall I can condone, you have so much momentum going into that finish line. Sprinters are taught to lean knowing that ones torso it what marks the finish, it’s quite easy to lose balance. To dive across the finish line is questionable but according to the track and field governing body, IAAF, it’s completely legal.

Clearly many think this is a terrible rule and I don’t disagree. There should be clarification, what constitutes as a fall and what constitutes as a dive. How can diving be allowed in what is described as a footrace?

I wish I could say Felix got robbed of a potential fifth gold medal but with the rules being as they are and me knowing she isn’t the first to do it, I can’t. Miller won and she did it by leaving everything out on the track.

THE KING AND HIS PRODIGY

Sometimes photo finishes aren’t about figuring out who the winner is sometimes it’s simply just about the photo. The men’s 200-meter semifinal provided one of those perfect photo moments.

Coming out of the turn Usain Bolt was in the lead and it was clear no one would be catching him. It became a race for the other automatic qualifying spot. Canada’s Andre De Grasse ran a great race. The further down the final stretch he got the further he pulled away from the rest of the field.

Then Bolt decided to slow down like he normally does in effort to save some energy. At 29-years-old it’s become a little more important in the sprinters routine. But De Grasse seemed to kick it up a notch, pushing Bolt to the finish line.

The reaction of the finish where the two runners neared and crossed the finish line with smiles on their faces was a positive one, but was it a positive one for the runners? Bolt seemed not entertained by the 21-year-olds antics. He is even quoted as saying, “it wasn’t cool.”

For some, Bolt’s reaction fuels the fire in the belief that the runner is too cocky. Bolt has every right to be cocky, but De Grasse has every right to push the envelope. Bolt can’t tell him how to run a race. Either way it will be entertaining to watch the two in the final.

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What to do when ‘it’s not fun anymore’

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Kids playing little league baseball in Hawaii

Earlier this month I came across a column published by the Washington Post where the author explained her thoughts on a startling statistic. According to a poll from the National Alliance for Youth Sports, around 70 percent of kids in the United States stop playing organized sports by the age of 13. Along with its findings, NAYS stated the reason for this exodus having to do with the fact that “it’s just not fun anymore.”

In her column in the Washington Post, Julianna W. Miner shared her thoughts on why she believes this reasoning to be true: Sports aren’t designed to be fun anymore, our culture no longer supports older kids playing for the fun of it, there is a clear push for kids to specialize, there is a cost to being competitive, and “it’s just the age.”

I can agree that 13 is a weird age. We are at our most vulnerable and most influential. Even at the high school level it’s noticeable that our peers influence our decisions from whether to go to class, to take AP or honors level academic courses or try out for a sports team.

The idea of needing to specialize influenced almost all of Miner’s points. When I was in middle school and high school, the biggest reason for teammates quitting was the simple fact that they were burnt out. They weren’t playing for the love of the game anymore. The feeling of needing to specialize is crazy these days. Kids from a young age are taught that if they want to be the best soccer player in the world, then all their focus needs to be on soccer.

The need to specialize and be the best, when we can’t all be the best, creates a negative environment around sports. It’s an environment that we need to actively work to remove. Participating in other sports and other activities can be helpful. Basketball can teach soccer players better ball movement since it’s a smaller playing area. Track can teach athletes how to run properly as well as build speed and endurance. Dedication and practice can come in multiple ways, and sometimes getting involved in other activities can help people discover that they have been chasing the wrong passion.

The LeBron James’ and Lionel Messis of the world show us that if we dedicate our time and work hard that we have the potential to be the best. But at the same time they teach us that we need to love it. The love for whatever it is that we do is what makes all the work we put in worthwhile. Even if you don’t become the next Tom Brady, your love for football doesn’t change.

Where I feel Miner missed the mark are her thoughts on competition. Growing up I had one of those dads who was not about that participation trophy life. If he had to pay for it, I wasn’t getting one. I grew up when the idea of participation trophies came to life, and they are now in full swing.

I believe being awarded for participation is one of the reasons kids are quitting. They don’t understand the idea of competition. It’s not that things have gotten too competitive. We are setting athletes up for failure if we teach them from their first season that everyone gets rewarded.

If the kid who scored the most goals and the kid who scored no goals get the same reward at the end of the season, what is that teaching the kid who scored no goals about hard work? How are we preparing them for not making the school team? It’s these kids who are hanging up their jerseys when the going gets tough.

Sports not only offer the start of a healthy lifestyle, it provides kids with life skills. From day one participants learn teamwork and dedication. They experience success and see what got them there. They experience failure and learn that it will only make them stronger.

I’m not sure why 70 percent of 13-year-olds are saying so long to sports but we need to find a way to change it.

To read Miner’s column visit, washingtonpost.com/news/parenting/wp/2016/06/01/why-70-percent-of-kids-quit-sports-by-age-13.