The Right to Sit

Before the Niners’ preseason game on Aug. 26 against the Green Bay Packers, Colin Kaepernick chose not to stand for the national anthem. Since then his name has been in news headlines and he is trending on Twitter.

What is the problem with choosing not to stand? The No. 1 argument is that it is disrespectful to our county, our flag and our military. But there is no law saying that U.S. citizens are required to stand when the “Star-Spangled Banner” is played. We aren’t the only country who stands when their national anthem is played. When other countries’ anthems are played, we are taught to stand out of a sign of respect. But what happens when that country isn’t respecting its citizens? Does that country still deserve a standing ovation?

Kaepernick chose not to stand for the national anthem because he believes that America isn’t living up to what it was founded on.

“Ultimately, it’s to bring awareness and make people realize what is really going on in this country,” Kaepernick said following the game. “There are a lot of things going on that is unjust, people aren’t being held accountable, and that is something that needs to change. This country stands for freedom, liberty and justice for all and that’s not happening right now.”

The main issue I’ve come to find from people who aren’t happy with Kaepernick’s stance is that it disrespects the military. Well, that’s not true. By choosing not to stand for the national anthem you are not disrespecting the U.S. military, you are exercising the very right that men and women in uniform have served and sacrificed for.

The First Amendment specifically states the right to freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, and freedom to peaceably assemble. It is this amendment and the remainder of the constitution that our military is fighting for. They fight so that we all have the right to do what Kaepernick chose to do. If you don’t believe me, check out #VeteransForKaepernick.

In his Donkey of the Day segment, Charlamagne tha God chose Kaepernick as his Aug. 29 donkey. And in that radio segment he brought up a good point, the flag represents a system and America is a business — “like any place of employment, when you promise your employees certain rights and don’t deliver, those employees have the right to speak out and demand what is promised.”

Kaepernick is demanding what the United States of America has promised ALL of its citizens because now not ALL of us are receiving those so-called promises.

Kaepernick is one of several athletes who have spoken out on the issues of police brutality and the system of racism that still exists in this country. But there is something that separates Kaepernick from the ESPY speech of Carmello Anthony, Lebron James, Dwayne Wade and Chris Paul. There is something that sets Kaepernick apart from all the rest. He is forcing you to take a side, forcing you to acknowledge that there needs to be some real change.

I think what many people need to ask themselves regarding the controversy — are you upset because he isn’t standing or are you upset with his reasoning for not standing? If the issue is solely with him not standing then, heads up, it is not an act of patriotism if we “need” to stand and if standing is the requirement you aren’t being patriotic for doing so. If your problem with Kaepernick’s stance is in regards to what he is standing for, then you are un-American for thinking that not all of America’s citizens deserve the same treatment and the same rights. If you think that all of America’s citizens receive the same treatment and the same rights, then you are blind.

In his op-ed to the Washington Post, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar voiced his support for Kaepernick and called his act highly patriotic, “What should horrify Americans is not Kaepernick’s choice to remain seated during the national anthem, but that nearly 50 years after (Muhammad) Ali was banned from boxing for his stance and Tommie Smith and John Carlos’s raised fists caused public ostracization and numerous death threats, we still need to call attention to the same racial inequities.” Ali, Smith, and Carlos are all black athletes who were once considered controversial for their protests but have since become iconic symbols of the U.S. civil rights movement.

I guess the real question is should we as a country celebrate how far we’ve come in regards to equality or continue to work toward improvement because we still have a long way to go? For me, we must continue to work on it and, because of that, I will continue to sit alongside Kaepernick on this one.

 

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